Category Archives: Writing

Starry Night and Agency

There was a story I wanted to tell. It was about a drug-addicted stripper in post-apocalyptic Edmonton and the dealer who wanted to save her and through her himself (or at least assuage his guilt). It’s not really a long … Continue reading

Award Eligibility

Time is crazy. I thought I had lots of time to get around to making an award eligibility blog post… and then World Weaver Press tweeted yesterday to remind people about all the things they’d published that were eligible and … Continue reading


A car accident shattered sixteen-year-old Morgan’s family. Now her brother’s dead, her mom’s like a wheelchair-bound shadow, her dad lives at work and her seven-year-old sister Amy tries too freaking hard to salvage everything. What’s more, high school is its … Continue reading

When Words Collide 2017 Recap

My WWC Schedule

Haunted Hospitals

Looking back at 2016

Each year I set goals for the year to come and share them on my blog here. At the end of each year I assess how well I did in accomplishing my goals and set new ones. It’s an important … Continue reading

2016 Eligibility Post

If you are nominating for industry awards this year please consider the following works of mine which I published in 2016: Short Story: Sharper Than a Griffin’s Claw, Women in Practical Armor, March 2016 Where I come from they say … Continue reading

2016 Advent Ghosts

To quote Loren Eaton from a couple years ago, “Advent Ghosts seeks to recreate the classic British tradition of swapping spooky stories at Yuletide. However, instead of penning longer pieces, we post bite-sized pieces of flash fiction for everyone to … Continue reading

Deviatus Podcast

Deviatus interviewed me for his podcast a couple weeks ago, and that episode is online now. Yay! We talked about haunted hospitals (the book and the concept), paranormal experiences, research, I forgot where Mount Fuji was (I wish I was … Continue reading

Women in Practical Armor

If women in fantasy are capable and intelligent enough to lead in battle, wouldn’t they also be intelligent enough to protect their abdomens, tie their hair back, and cover their faces in battle? Edited by Ed Greenwood and Gabrielle Harbowy, … Continue reading