Category Archives: Editing

Metastasis Contributor Interview: Robert Dawson

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeRobert Dawson, the author of “Folklore of Lunenburg County”, is my guest interviewee today. I loved Robert’s story and enjoyed a little insight into what inspired it, as well as what Robert thought of the anthology as a whole. I suspect you will too 🙂

Who or what was the inspiration for your story in Metastasis?

To be honest, the starting point was the setting and the bootlegging, not the cancer. That came into the story because I was wondering “what could an alien artifact do on the scale of an individual human life?” and that was the answer that came to me.

When it comes to cancer, what gives you hope?

We do seem to know a lot more about it than we used to, individually and collectively. And knowledge is power.

Not counting your own, which story or poem in Metastasis is your favourite?

That’s not a fair question! They’re all so different. How to compare Jay Lake’s dispatch from the trenches with the giggly gallows humor of David McLain’s spoof article? The narrative with perfectly-embedded metaphors of `Hunter’ with the sparse sting-in-the-tail abstraction of `A Murder of Crows’?  The reassuring hard SF of `Tide Pools’ and `Quantum Therapy’ with a classic ghost story like `The Lady in the Doorway’?  And where to put the truly weird ones like `Painter X’ and `Cancer Maximized’?

Sorry. In the word supposed to answer a Zen koan, “Mu.”

Robert Dawson teaches mathematics at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His SF stories have appeared in AE, Imaginaire, the anthology Dandelions of Mars, and elsewhere; and he has had poems published in magazines such as Rampike, Parody, and Dalhousie Review. His other interests include cycling, fencing, hiking, and music. He is married to Bridget Thomas, a meteorologist; they have one son in Grade 12 and one in university.

Website:  http://cs.smu.ca/~dawson/Writing/

 

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis Contributor Interview: Cat Jenkins

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeOver the past few days I’ve been sharing short interviews with some of the contributors of Metastasis here. Today’s interviewee is Cat Jenkins. When it came time to order the stories in this anthology I very deliberately did it so that Cat’s story came last. I really wanted the ending of her story to be the last words of fiction you, as the reader, saw before moving on to read Jay Lake’s afterword. The ending of Like Sunlit Honey is one that stays with me and I think it will stay with me for a very, very, very long time. As will her pure honesty in answering these interview questions.

Who or what was the inspiration for your story in Metastasis?

It’s so tempting, when asked about inspiration, to masquerade behind some deep thought, some high ideal; to take the opportunity to make others think you have access to truth on a more profound level; to make it all about you and your incredible perception.

But it’s not like that at all.

These words won’t mean a thing unless they come from a place so honest and real, that it hurts to write them.

The inspiration for ‘Like Sunlit Honey’ was sunlight. The light that shone through the window of my mother’s hospital room on the last day I saw her…the day I told her the biggest lie of my life. The day I stood in the corridor afterwards, trying to remember how to breathe, while a nurse, a total stranger, told me what I’d done was a beautiful thing. She hugged me, kissed my hair, and pushed me toward the elevators.

“Go home. She can die in peace now.”

Home.

I come from one more shattered than broken. One of the sharpest shards was my big sister, my mother’s firstborn. Sis abandoned the family when I was a child. Mom’s last wish was for reconciliation of a breach of trust and ties, the breaking of which she never understood. But Sis was not about to forsake the anger and teenage bitterness she’d held so close for so long, defining her life in a way that allowed deflection of blame; avoidance of explanation.

I entered my mother’s room to admit defeat. Sis would not come. There would be no final farewell.

But when Mom looked up, she didn’t see me; she saw the one person she wanted most. She asked me questions that had nothing to do with my past, my circumstances; that confused me at first, until I realized for whom such questions were meant. The confirmation of my suspicion came when she at last called me by my sister’s name.

Stunned, I looked out the window, mind racing.

Should I correct her? Should I stick to the truth and let her find her own way to deal with it? Should I refuse to have any part of this travesty of familial ties?

Today, in retrospect, I don’t know if what I did was right. But at that instant, with the sun pouring its clear light into a room where a soul was ready to take its leave of mortality…in that bright, white moment…truth was unimportant. What mattered was strength and commitment…and love.

I kept my back to the window, hoping the sun’s fierce illumination, backlighting me, would prevent Mom from recognizing her error. I played along until she closed her eyes and the sun had set.

When all was said and done, there was only peace, and quiet, and a beloved face, strangely transfigured, luminous…like sunlit honey.

It hurt to lie. It still hurts. But that light…that light was…beautiful. It wasn’t until much later, as I relived that day, that I realized the light was still there, still bathing her, long after the sun was gone. It was almost as though she was the source; the light was leaving her, to join with something greater.

How has cancer touched your life?

Shortly after my contribution to “Metastasis” was accepted, I received a phone call. A family friend, a tough guy, a retired cop. His alpha male voice had turned frail, fragile.

“Diane has cancer.”

His beloved wife; the center of a family filled with laughter and love I’d always admired and secretly envied.

“Diane has cancer…”

So inadequate, the standard, sympathetic noises we make to each other at such times.

“It’s the most aggressive type of breast cancer there is…”

We fall into the silences between sentences together. It’s dark and black and we don’t know how to get out.

“It’s spread to her liver…”

And while we each interpret this in very private, very quiet horror, I wonder how Diane feels. We are only ripples. She is the epicenter.

“She begins chemo next week…”

My stomach twists, imagining the pharmaceutical struggle to which she has committed herself. Secretly, for I will never admit my cowardice, I wonder ‘why?’ Why does she choose to fight what sounds like a losing battle? Why not savor what’s left without the illness, the indignity, of chemo?

He tells me she has called her firstborn, a grown son with a family of his own, to fly in from the South tomorrow.

“She wants to see him before she loses her hair…”

We both know she’s taking her leave; giving her eldest child one more memory of the mother he loves and recalls as vital, glowing, alive with a pulse and a beat so strong it’s infectious.

Cancer hasn’t touched my life. It touched Diane’s.

But Diane’s life has touched so many, so beautifully. ‘Courage’ is the first word that has always come to mind when she is the subject. Always. Not in cancer’s aftermath. Cancer is only a footnote.

Diane is the story that will overwhelm and outlast cancer’s touch.

When it comes to cancer, what gives you hope?

People. And love. And light.

And the absolute certainty that through it all, there runs a current. If you can still the storms that cancer provokes in your soul…the rage, and terror, and the primal scream of refusal…you’ll feel it. It brings a rightness, and a peace, and a purpose.

I can’t explain. But some things I know. And this is one of them: In the end, we win.

This mindless disease has no soul.

We win.

catjenkins

 

Cat Jenkins lives in the Pacific Northwest, where the weather is often conducive to long hours before a keyboard. She has been thrilled to have short stories in horror, fantasy, speculative fiction and humor published. She anticipates finishing her first novel whenever the next round of foggy, wet weather rolls in. In the meantime, Cat posts stories on the internet about strange people and places and hospitals that specialize in treating patients with psychic abilities…. Writer’s block dissipates when confronted with the question “What if…?”

 

 

 

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis Contributor Interview: David Sklar

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeDavid Sklar is the next contributor in the series of Metastasis interviews I’m hosting here on my blog. David’s story, Quantum Therapy, is a weird and wonderful contribution to this anthology.

Who or what was the inspiration for your story in Metastasis?

As best I recall it, “Quantum Therapy” didn’t start with thinking about cancer; it started with watching a TV show about string theory and thinking, “How would they apply this to medicine?” Because it seems like, whenever people learn something new about how the world works, they try to apply it in three places: In war, in medicine, and in business. So it’s “how can I use this to kill people?” “how can I use this to save people?” and “how can it make me money?” And I’m not interested in war, and not as interested in business as I really should be, but there’s fascinating stuff going on in medicine these days, with stuff like nanobots and biologic therapies. So what would be the medical application of tiny particles that move in and out of alternate universes?

How has cancer touched your life?

Cancer hasn’t hit my life as hard as it has some other people I know. I lost three grandparents to cancer, but they were all in their late 70s or 80s. The one who died young was killed by a heart attack. And I’ve got a sibling who died of myesthenia gravis.

My mother’s around 70 now, and she had cancer, but she survived. And a couple of relatives by marriage have also survived cancer not long ago. So cancer hasn’t hit me personally that hard.

But I’ve got friends who’ve had it worse. Some who lost their mother to cancer, and another good friend whose brother-in-law passed away. Around my age, and he got cancer of the liver. He beat his prognosis by years, but in the end it still laid him low, and it left behind a young widow and two kids, and now they have to grow up without their dad.

Another thing, though I don’t think it’s what you meant when you asked the question–cancer has been a part of my professional life. I’ve been writing and editing medical communications since 1998–sometimes advertising, sometimes more complicated scientific writing to inform doctors about new treatments. And I’ve learned a lot about cancer on the job. A lot of the science in this story–not all of it, but a lot–is based on things I’ve read about in the workplace.

When it comes to cancer, what gives you hope?

Hope’s a funny thing. I mean, ultimately, we’re all gonna die of something, and there’s no way around that.  But when it comes to cancer–when it comes to a lot of diseases that used to be incurable–there are just some fascinating things going on in medicine, like I said.

Like angiogenesis inhibitors. You know, when a tumor grows, the old way to treat it was to kill off all the growing cells for a while, and hope they get the cancer with all the rest. That’s what chemotherapy is. But now, they think “What does a tumor need?” It needs oxygen, so it needs blood. So inside of a tumor there’s this tangle of new veins and arteries, growing fast to support the tumor’s rapid growth. But the rest of your body has most of the veins and arteries it needs already. So they have these drugs that stop your body from growing any new veins–instead of killing all the growing cells, they just stop what the cancer needs most, and they starve the tumor.

And then there’s new ways to target the cancer–so instead of putting chemo drugs into your whole body, they’re developing new ways to tag the cancer cells so they can deliver the medicine there and only there. That way they can give a higher dose where you need it, and little or none of the medicine where you don’t.

While I was revising “Quantum Therapy,” there was an advance in this targeted medicine, and it made headlines. I was incorporating technical comments from my friend Jenn, who’s an MD in Colorado, and I see this article in my newsfeed, about–I think they called them nanoparticles–so I worked them into the story, just in a mention in one scene, and I e-mailed Jenn the article, and she looked up more about it and told me some more about the nuances of how it works. That was pretty cool.

And you know, what if she tells a colleague about this article, and that colleague uses this therapy? My story may save a life. Probably not, because Jenn’s not an oncologist, she’s in family practice. And because when this treatment becomes viable, it will probably be in lots of oncology journals. But all the same, silly though it may be, it’s fun to think that my researchDavid Sklar for a work of fiction might result in somebody getting a lifesaving treatment.

David Sklar‘s work has appeared in an odd eclectitude of places, including Strange Horizons, Ladybug, and Scheherazade’s Façade. As a freelance writer and medical editor, David has researched cutting-edge cancer treatments and served as managing editor of a newsletter for health care professionals who treat melanoma. This story of Schrödinger’s cancer is the first time he has applied this experience to his fiction writing.The medical science in “Quantum Therapy” was reviewed by Jenn Hronkin, MD. The quantum physics was reviewed by Sandy McReynolds, PhD, who simultaneously does and does not attest to its veracity.For more about David and his work, please visit http://davidwriting.com

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis Contributor Interview: Beth Cato

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeOver the past couple days I’ve been sharing super short interviews with Metastasis contributors. The next in our series is of Beth Cato. Beth has not just one, but two poems in this collection and I’m pretty sure you’re going to love both of them. I do.

Who was the inspiration for your poem in Metastasis?

I have two poems in the anthology, and one of them is personal. “Hunter” is directly inspired by my cat Palom, who succumbed to cancer last year. He was a meddlesome brat–the sort who stuck his nose in every grocery bag and delivered terror to Christmas tree ornaments–and also the most lovable, social cat I’ve ever known. He greeted everyone at the door, inspected purses and shoes, and groomed people if necessary. I miss him every single day.

When it comes to cancer, what gives you hope?
That science fiction is becoming fact. That when a family member of mine had prostate cancer, a robot removed his prostate without any issue–and the man remains healthy several years later. That my mom had benign lesions growing in her eyes and underwent radiation to save her sight. This technology didn’t exist ten years ago. It makes me excited for what will come next–and who it will save.
You write a lot about healers. Is that because of a personal connection to cancer?
Yes. When I was four, my grandpa was diagnosed with myelofibrosis, a severe bone marrow disorder, and was told he had six months to live. He lived another seven years. Because of immune issues, he also was fighting valley fever, cancer, and other ailments by the end. I grew up with the awareness that he was dying. Soon after his death, I discovered role playing games and the healer archetype: white wizards, clerics, priestesses, etc. They’ve been something of an obsession for me ever since. My steampunk novel due out next year has a healer as a main character. If I could have any superpower, without any hesitation I would ask for the ability to cure the sick.
Palom
Palom napping

 

Beth Cato’s debut steampunk novel will be released by HarperCollins Voyager in late 2014. She’s originally from Hanford, California, but now resides in Arizona with her husband and son. Her short fiction, poetry, and tasty cookie recipes can be found at http://www.bethcato.com.

 

 

 

 

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis Contributor Interview: Marge Simon

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeMetastasis, a speculative anthology to benefit cancer research (which I edited) was recently released and some of the contributors agreed to participate in super short interviews here on my blog. One of those contributors is Marge Simon. I’ve known Marge for a few years now, we met through Niteblade (she does all our art) and connected very quickly. Not only does Marge have a poem in this anthology, she has also donated her artistic talents and illustrated some of the pieces within. Just one more awesome part of the book 🙂

What inspired your poem for Metastasis?

This poem was originally written for  a collection with Charlee Jacob, focused on a world wide apocalypse caused by plague, Vectors, A Week in the Death of a Planet.  I tweaked it a bit and altered the title. Cancer is  a plague of another sort.

How has cancer touched your life?

Cancer took my mother, and two good friends are cancer survivors. Everyone nowadays knows someone (friend or relative) who has battled cancer. A number of teachers at my school were afflicted by some form of cancer. I still wonder if the location of the new school  had something to do with it– at least one of the staff or faculty every year.

Why did you choose this scenario of a child and his grandmother reading to him from a fairy tale book? (SPOILER ALERT: The answer contains spoilers for those who haven’t read the poem yet)

Because it makes the poem more poignant when you realize that he is as yet cancer free, but his mother is gone (perhaps to a hospital for care, perhaps to be cured) and his grandmother knows this, and knows she is also dying of it. So the boy waits eagerly for his mother to come for him. And still we all have hope.

Marge 2012

 

Marge Simon’s works appear in publications such as Strange Horizons, Niteblade, DailySF Magazine, Pedestal Magazine, Dreams & Nightmares. She edits a column for the HWA Newsletter and serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees.  She has won the Strange Horizons Readers Choice Award, the Bram Stoker Award™(2008, 2012), the Rhysling Award and the Dwarf Stars Award. Collections: Like Birds in the Rain, Unearthly Delights, The Mad Hattery, Vampires, Zombies & Wanton Souls, and Dangerous Dreams. Member HWA, SFWA, SFPA.  www.margesimon.com

 

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis Contributor Interview: Rie Sheridan Rose

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeSome of the contributors to Metastasis have volunteered to participate in super short interviews that I am going to share here on my blog over the coming few days. The first of those participants is Rie Sheridan Rose. Rie was a very determined contributor, she submitted several poems to me before eventually sending the one which won me over, A Murder of Crows. I was biased to love this poem just because it had crows in it, but as you’ll see if you pick up a copy of Metastasis, her crows are not exactly the kind anyone would ever want to meet.

Who or what was the inspiration for your story in Metastasis?

My desire to be a part of Metastasis, and my poem, stemmed from a need to come to terms with losing a dear friend that I didn’t even know was sick until too late to say goodbye. Her name was Susan M. Garrett, and I dedicated my poem to her.

How has cancer touched your life?

I have lost several family members to cancer or related complications. It is a specter that looms over us everyday.

When it comes to cancer, what gives you hope?

There have been many promising advances in the last few years, and research is continuous. I hope to see an end to at least some forms of cancer in my lifetime. As long as there are dedicated researchers giving their all to the problem, it is definitely a hope with potential.

Rie Sheridan Rose


Rie Sheridan Rose has been writing professionally for over ten years. In that decade, she has published 5 poetry collections. Her poetry has appeared in the print magazines Mythic Circle, Dreams of Decadence, and Abandoned Towers as well as the Di-Verse-City and Boundless anthologies. She has also had pieces accepted by Penumbra, Wolf Willow Magazine, The Voices Project, and Fragrance Online Magazine. In conjunction with Marc Gunn, she wrote lyrics for the “Don’t Go Drinking With Hobbits” CD. Visit riewriter.com for more news and info.

 

Metastasis is available at:

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Metastasis: It’s Here!

Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol Hightshoe

Today is the day Metastasis officially goes on sale. I could spend this blog post telling you all the reasons you ought to buy a copy, but I’ve spent months doing that already so instead I’m just going to pass on information about where you can find it and how you can receive a 25% discount 🙂

So many options! If you are ordering an electronic copy prior to October 31, 2013 I suggest using Smashwords or Createspace as I’ve got 25% coupons for both places to share. If you are purchasing a physical copy I can still offer a Createspace coupon but if you live outside the US double check your shipping costs before ordering, sometimes even with a coupon it’s significantly less expensive to order from Amazon.

Amazon.com
Paperback – $14.95
Kindle – $6.95

Kobo
ePub – $6.95

Smashwords — Use coupon code LM63L in order to receive 25% off your order
ePub – $6.95
Kindle – $6.95
PDF – $6.95

Createspace — Use coupon code TGERED9J in order to receive 25% off your order
Paperback – $14.95

All coupons codes expire on October 31, 2013.

Over the coming days I will be sharing short interviews with some of the contributors to Metastasis, I hope you’ll pop back to get a peek into the lives and minds of some of the incredibly talented people behind this anthology.

Please help us spread the word about the release of Metastasis by telling your friends and family, and thank you so very much for your support. It has been amazing.

Back Cover

Clicky, clicky to make bigger

Schtuff

Durr

Right. So, today when I got home from Thanksgiving dinner there was an email in my inbox asking for a high resolution photo of myself for use in some of the promo stuff for Tesseracts 17. Ever since I became overweight I’ve tried to mostly stay on the other side of the camera (I know it’s not a good thing, I know, but I do it anyway) so I don’t have any high resolution photographs of myself, so I asked Jo to snap a couple

The one up there? That was my favourite. I chose a slightly more professional one to send to the people at EDGE though 🙂

Speaking of Tesseracts 17, it has a trailer. I think this is the first book I’ve been in that had a trailer. You can check it out here:

Also in the category of ‘schtuff’ don’t forget that I’m still giving away copies of Niteblade and running a raffle for a super awesome grab bag of goodies. You can get links to the Niteblade issues by following that link, but because I’m so super awesome I’m going to re-post the rafflecopter stuff here so you don’t have to go anywhere to enter that draw 🙂

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Lastly, don’t forget that Metastasis is coming out on Tuesday. I’m super proud of this book and I can’t wait to share it with the world. What’s more, I’ll be hosting mini interviews with some of the contributors in the days following the release so you’ll want to pop by to check them out too.

Finally? Happy Thanksgiving fellow Canadians! And if you’re not Canadian, well, I hope you have a fabulous weekend anyway 😉

A is for Apocalypse

What do you get when you take 26 amazing writers, assign them a letter of the alphabet and give them complete artistic freedom within a theme? In 2014 we’ll find out with the release of the first of a series of anthologies:

A is for Apocalypse

A is for Apocalypse is going to be filled with 26 apocalyptic stories (one for each letter of the alphabet) by incredibly talented writers whose diverse styles and preferred themes leave no doubt that this collection will have something for everyone. The writers who are contributing to this collection are:

~ Brenda Stokes Barron ~ Marge Simon / Michael Fosburg ~ Milo James Fowler ~ Beth Cato ~ Simon Kewin ~ Suzanne van Rooyen ~ Alexandra Seidel ~ Sara Cleto ~ Kenneth Schneyer ~ KV Taylor ~ Gary B. Phillips ~ BD Wilson ~ Ennis Drake ~ C.S. MacCath ~ Michael Kellar ~ Cindy James ~ Brittany Warman ~ K.L. Young ~ Pete Aldin ~ Cory Cone ~ Damien Angelica Walters ~ Samantha Kymmell-Harvey ~ Lilah Wild ~ Jonathan Parrish ~ Alexis A. Hunter ~ Steve Bornstein ~

Metastasis Press Release

wolfsingerlogo

WolfSinger Publications is pleased to announce the upcoming release of

METASTASIS: An Anthology to Support Cancer Research.

“Walk with us.” -Jay Lake

 Metastasis Cover - artwork by Jonathan Parrish, Cover design by Carol HightshoeWalk with us as we explore the world of cancer as seen through a speculative fiction lens. Hold our hands while we venture into the world of what-ifs. Take a journey at our side as we experience the full spectrum of what cancer has to offer. The light, the darkness.

Within these pages you’ll meet a woman who adores her cancer as a lover, another who sees it as her ticket to immortality. We’ll meet a boy willing to do anything to save his mother and another with superpowers. There’s a witch who uses magic to fight against the beast ravaging her friend’s body, a cat whose capacity for love is unparalleled, a damaged musician, aliens, a goddess butterfly and so much more.

These are not easy stories to read. This is not a comforting collection that will wipe your fears away and make everything all right. It’s not that kind of book. These stories will make you cry, but they’ll also make you laugh. They’ll touch you and stir emotions. These stories aren’t all fun, but they are important. All of them.

Edited by Rhonda Parrish, this extraordinary collection of speculative fiction revolves around the theme of cancer. Including work by award-winning and bestselling authors including Jay Lake and Kevin J. Anderson, these 26 stories and poems tell tales of pain and hope, love and loss, fear and strength.

Cancer scares us. There is so much we don’t know about it, but it’s out there, waiting to strike. This anthology attempts to strike back by supporting research that will develop new treatments and, eventually, find a cure.

WolfSinger Publications, the editor and contributors combined are donating a total of 62.5% of all proceeds to the American Cancer Society.

Metastasis is scheduled for release on Oct 15th, 2013. It will be available through Amazon.com and other online retailers, and can also be ordered through local bookstores.

Metastasis

Edited by Rhonda Parrish
Print ISBN: 978-1-936099-54-2
Print Price: $14.95
eBook Price: $6.95

For more information please contact the publisher at editor@wolfsingerpubs.com


I would just like to add, because you can’t really see it super clearly on the cover image I’ve posted up there, that Metastasis has been honored to include an afterword by Jay Lake AND it sports a spifftacular blurb from the amazing Lucy A. Snyder which reads:

“A strong, worthwhile anthology of poignant fiction and poetry.”

Lucy A. Snyder, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Chimeric Machines

And did you see the part in the press release where 62.5% of proceeds are going to benefit cancer research? That. Is. Awesome.

So Many Things!

Lanterns and MoonlightI have so many things to talk about today. Some of them probably deserve a blog post of their own but I don’t want the people who subscribe to my blog (and if you don’t, you should, she says pointing to the little subscriber box to the right) to be totally inundated with stuff so ‘all the things’ are going to have to share one blog post. I’m sure they’ll manage it somehow.

Firstly, I have a new poem out today. My poem, Mary-Lee, was published this morning at Every Day Poets. It’s a short piece with a horror-y flavour which may be why EDP is using it to kick off October.

I also have news on the Fae front (as you may have guessed from the fairy picture dominating this blog post). We’ve been open to submissions for a month now, so it seemed a good time to give a quick update from the slush pile. My blog entry about what I’m seeing so far and what I’d like to see more of is up over at World Weaver Press’s blog –> Update from the Slush Pile: Fae Anthology. The short version is that I’m mostly looking for things I haven’t seen before, but really if you’re thinking about submitting to Fae pop over and read the whole blog post. It’s short and I think you’ll find it very helpful in making it onto my short list.

But wait! There’s more!CreepyFreebies - badge

This month I will be participating in Milo James Fowler‘s ‘Creepy Freebies’ event. Every Friday in October Milo and some of his friends will be giving away fun and freaky freebies. I’m not particularly sure how ‘creepy’ my freebies are, but they are free and they are awesome (even if I do say so myself LoL). This Friday it will be Milo, Erin Cole, Stoney M. Setzer and myself who will be giving away freebies.

I don’t want to totally give away what I’m giving away (heh!) but I will say that I’m hosting two giveaways. One is on behalf of Niteblade and the other is from me personally. I think they are both pretty awesome, so pop by again on Friday to learn all about them and pick up your freebies.