Marge Simon

Fractured Friday: Marge Simon

Cover design by Jonathan C. Parrish, original artwork by Tory HokeFor the next several weeks I’ve decided to call Fridays ‘Fractured Friday’ and use them to share news, contributor interviews and excerpts from B is for Broken.

B is for Broken is the second title in the Alphabet Anthologies series. It follows A is for Apocalypse and will in turn be followed by C is for Chimera. Each story in the series is associated with a letter of the alphabet and is titled in the letter is for word format. What’s more, just to keep things nice and complicated, the story’s title isn’t shared at the beginning but at the end so that you can guess at what it might be while you read.

On that note, even though the story titles could be considered spoilers because of how the book is formatted, for the sake of simplicity if the author has chosen to post their title publicly somewhere else (their blog, Facebook, wherever) I am going to include it in my posts. If they haven’t revealed that information, though, I’ll list the story titles as Letter is for…

I met Marge way back in 2007. I’m not sure exactly when but it was before September. I know that because September 2007 is then the first issue of Niteblade came out and I’d already been in contact with Marge by then because she did the cover (and every cover since). Marge has been a great friend, encouraged me in my writing, offered support as I found my way as an editor and Niteblade would not be the same without her artwork. It’s a pleasure to work with her and I’m pleased to have been able to do it for both A is for Apocalypse and B is for Broken (in addition to our other projects).

Marge and Michael Fosburg collaborated on a story for B is for Broken.

Interview With Marge Simon

What letter were you assigned? T

Please share a short excerpt from your story:

Hessura motioned Timon inside the bedroom. In her arms, a second child. “This one too, Timon.”

“A demon-son!” Timon gasped, and forked his fingers at the sleeping babe. “’The second chases after the first’ — a bad omen.”

“Aye, “ Hessura nodded. “Cursed by that yellow moon, Japeph would say. He’d have it killed.” She turned her head and spat. “A fishwife’s tale, if I ever heard one—and I’ve heard them all.”

Timon frowned, but he reached his finger to the tiny hand and grinned as the boy clasped it. “We must never let them know of this one,” he said. “Can you handle this, Hessura?”

What is the thing you’ve most regretted breaking? The heart of my first “true love” – but it wasn’t as real for my fickle young self as it was for him.

Have you ever broken something and not been saddened by it? Can you tell us about that? I tore up a photograph of a former boyfriend and me at a dance. Does that count?

If you could break one law and get away with it consequence-free, what would it be? I can’t answer this. I’m too “anal” about the idea of breaking the law. But I do lots of other wicked things.

Do you have any rules for yourself, a code of some sort, which you’d never break? Yes, writing a super trite story with lots of blood and guts and bad language–so poorly contrived that it makes me sick. But if I could write like Jeff Strand (brilliantly humorous), I might break the rule!

Did you struggle with the letter you were assigned, or did the ideas come freely? Ideas came freely!

What was your favourite idea you didn’t use? I wrote one about Lizzie Bordon, but it was pretty hokey, and Michael (Fosburg) had a better idea. I’m glad we went with his. I later rewrote the Lizzie Borden piece and sold it to Max Booth for an anthology (Perpetual Motion Publishing).

 


 

Marge SimonMarge Simon‘s works appear in publications such as DailySF Magazine, Pedestal, Urban Fantasist. She edits a column for the HWA Newsletter, “Blood & Spades: Poets of the Dark Side,” and serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees. She won the Strange Horizons Readers Choice Award, 2010, and the SFPA’s Dwarf Stars Award, 2012. She has won three Bram Stoker Awards ® for Superior Work in Poetry and has poetry in HWA’s Simon & Schuster collection, It’s Scary Out There, 2015. Marge also has poems in Darke Phantastique, Qualia Nous collections, and Spectral Realms, 2014. www.margesimon.com

B is for Broken is available now at:
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Kobo
Amazon
Barnes and Noble

And add it to your shelves at Goodreads

 

Scarecrow Cover Reveal

Scarecrow edited by Rhonda Parrish

Oh.

My.

Gawd.

I love this cover. Don’t you just love this cover? I feel like this anthology series has been blessed with great covers (thank you Eileen!) but this one is my favourite. Love, love, love, love, love it.

Oh. But wait. There’s more! In addition revealing the cover of Scarecrow I have copies to give away! There are two ways to win (I suggest entering both draws LOL). The first is a Goodreads giveaway. We’re giving a copy of Scarecrow to two lucky winners (US and Canada only, sorry :-/ ). It’s super easy to enter, you can just click here to go to the page on Goodreads or use this:

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Scarecrow by Rhonda Parrish

Scarecrow

by Rhonda Parrish

Giveaway ends August 03, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

That draw is only open for like 5 days (it closes on August 3rd). Can we get 500 entries in 5 days? I don’t know, but let’s try! 🙂

The other way to enter to win a copy (well, actually ten copies) of Scarecrow is via #ScarecrowSelfies. This one is open to people anywhere in the world. You can check out all the details by clicking here, and in the meantime take a look at the entries that have come in so far:

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Awesome. Like that cover. Amirite?

Imaginarium 4: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing

Imaginarium 4OMG!

I have been DYING to share this news and now I can–I have a poem in Imaginarium 4: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing!!

I’m so excited. Firstly to have my work, Hereditary Delusions, included in this collection at all. It means an awful lot to me to share a table of contents with the mind-blowingly talented authors whose work is included here, it means a lot to have my poem chosen for inclusion in any anthology by two awesome editors and possibly most of all, it means a lot to have my poetry under a cover that says ‘Best Canadian Speculative Writing‘*.

I left this announcement off for two days in the hopes I’d be beyond gushing by now and able to post a nice, professional announcement, but it seems that isn’t going to happen–I’m still too full of squee–so just check out this amazing TOC:

Introduction
Margaret Atwood

Bamboozled
Kelley Armstrong

Witch I
Courtney Bates-Hardy

Witch II
Courney Bates-Hardy

The Smut Story
Greg Bechtel

Kafka’s Notebooks
Jocko Benoit

The Full Lazenby
Jeremy Butler

Wendigo Nights
Siobhan Carroll

A Spell for Rebuilding Your Lover Out of Snow
Peter Chiykowski

Túshūguăn
Eric Choi

Jelly and the D-Machine
Suzanne Church

The Perfect Library
David Clink

The Colour of Paradox
A.M. Dellamonica

The Man Who Sold the Moon
Cory Doctorow

Brains, Brains, Brains
Puneet Dutt

The Lonely Sea in the Sky
Amal El-Mohtar

A Wish from a Bone
Gemma Files

We Be Naked
Zsuzsi Gartner

The God of Lost Things
Neile Graham

The Lark, The Peat The Star, and Our Time
Neile Graham

Chant for Summer Darkness in Northwest Climes
Neile Graham

The Beat that Billie Bore
Lisa L. Hannett

The Trial of the Beekeeper
Shivaun Hoad

Self-Portrait as Bilbo Baggins
Ada Hoffmann

The Parable of the Supervillain
Ada Hoffmann

The Mermaid at Seaworld
Ada Hoffmann

Left Foot, Right
Nalo Hopkinson

Return to Bear Creek
Louisa Howerow

The Inn of the Seven Blessings
Matthew Hughes

What You Couldn’t Leave Behind
Matthew Johnson

Hollywood North
Michael Libling

Sideshow
Catherine MacLeod

Aversions
Helen Marshall

Death and the Girl from Pi Delta Zeta
Helen Marshall

You’re a Winner
Matt Moore

Man in Blue Overcoat
Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Exorcist: A Love Story
David Nickle

Hereditary Delusions
Rhonda Parrish

The Marotte
Tony Pi

Charlemagne and Florent
Ranylt Richildis

Standard Deviant
Holly Schofield

The Tun
Trevor Shikaze

Demoted
Kate Story

The Snows of Yesteryear
Jean-Louis Trudel

Giants
Peter Watts

From Stone and Bone, From Earth and Sky
A.C. Wise

Outside Heavenly
Rio Youers

Release Date: Aug 18, 2015

*Again. I had a poem in the first one too

Corvidae Contributor Interview — Jane Yolen

CORVIDAE blog tour banner

Over the coming weeks I’d like to share interviews that I (and Magnus) conducted with the contributors to Corvidae and Scarecrow. I’m going to begin with the amazing Jane Yolen because, c’mon, she’s Jane-freaking-Yolen.

Interview with Jane Yolen

Please share a short excerpt from your story/stories:

Part of one of my two poems in the volume:

Postcards from the Abyss
No “Wish you were here,”
no “Having a good time,”
only a sniff of sulfur,
groans from a nearby hummock,
three crows lifting off a limb,
probably laughing at the reader,
but who can tell with corvids.

What is it about corvids that inspired you to write about them? We are a family of birders, and corvids are among the smartest (and sassiest) of birds.

Was there one corvid characteristic you wanted to highlight more than others? Their knowingness.

Do you think you were successful? I can only hope. . . .

If you were a corvid, what would you build your nest out of? Coins and bottlecaps and peacock feathers.

What’s your favourite ‘shiny’ thing? My earring collection.

If you have work in both anthologies, which came first? The corvid or the scarecrow? Corvid first.

 

As you may know, one of Edmonton’s local Twitter personalities is Magnus E. Magpie who haunts Twitter as @YEGMagpie. I invited him to read an advance copy of Corvidae and Scarecrow and offer a short cawmentary on each story from a magpie’s point of view, which he did. When he was finished I asked if there was anything he’d like to ask the contributors. The italicized portions are mine because Magnus didn’t ask straight-forward questions on account of he’s a magpie 🙂

 

Mr. Yegpie: It would be cool to know where all these stories came from, I mean geographically – like I think I could tell who was from Edmonton and who was from Vancouver! (Where do you live, and did that affect your story/poem at all?)

Massachusetts in the States. Summers in St Andrews, Scotland. Being a birder was more of an influence than where I live.

Mr. Yegpie: I also would sure love to know where they got their ideas from! I caught several familiar references from existing books and mythology and fairy tales; I like seeing people riff off stuff. (What inspired your story/poem?)

I love knowing the venereal (collective) names of animals and birds. One of my favorites has always been “ A Murder of Crows.” So that poem came naturally. “Postcards from the Abyss” is one of the many poems I have written to my birder husband, dead these nine years.

Mr. Yegpie: I think I would like to know what people’s favourite corvid is though; and if it isn’t a magpie, WHYEVER NOT?!? (If they come back with some guff about crows using tools, PLEASE LET ME KNOW AND I WILL SEND THEM A COPY OF MY ROGERS BILL. Pffft, crows.) (What is your favourite corvid?)

Sorry—but it’s crows for me. Though I love the look of magpies strutting across my Scottish lawn.

 
JaneJane Yolen, often called “the Hans Christian Andersen of America”(Newsweek) is the author of well over 350 books, including OWL MOON, THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC, and HOW DO DINOSAURS SAY GOODNIGHT. Her books and stories have won an assortment of awards–two Nebulas, a World Fantasy Award, a Caldecott, the Golden Kite Award, three Mythopoeic awards, two Christopher Medals, a nomination for the National Book Award, and the Jewish Book Award, among many others. She has been nominated three times for the Pushcart Prize in Poetry. She is also the winner (for body of work) of the World Fantasy Assn. Lifetime Achievement Award, Science Fiction Poetry Association Grand Master Award, Catholic Library’s Regina Medal, Kerlan Medal from the University of Minnesota, the du Grummond Medal from Un. of Southern Missisippi, the Smith College Alumnae Medal, and New England Pubic Radio Arts and Humanities Award . Six colleges and universities have given her honorary doctorates. Her website is: www.janeyolen.com

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Cover for CORVIDAE. Design by Eileen Wiedbrauk

Available Direct from the Publisher:
World Weaver Press

Or Find it Online:
Amazon
Goodreads
Kobo

Simon Kewin

Fractured Friday: Simon Kewin

Cover design by Jonathan C. Parrish, original artwork by Tory HokeFor the next several weeks I’ve decided to call Fridays ‘Fractured Friday’ and use them to share news, contributor interviews and excerpts from B is for Broken.

B is for Broken is the second title in the Alphabet Anthologies series. It follows A is for Apocalypse and will in turn be followed by C is for Chimera. Each story in the series is associated with a letter of the alphabet and is titled in the letter is for word format. What’s more, just to keep things nice and complicated, the story’s title isn’t shared at the beginning but at the end so that you can guess at what it might be while you read.

On that note, even though the story titles could be considered spoilers because of how the book is formatted, for the sake of simplicity if the author has chosen to post their title publicly somewhere else (their blog, Facebook, wherever) I am going to include it in my posts. If they haven’t revealed that information, though, I’ll list the story titles as Letter is for…

 


I don’t remember where I met Simon but it might have been from Write 1 Sub 1. Maybe? I may not be clear on that, but I am clear on this–Simon’s stories are awesome 🙂 I’m proud to include his work in both A is for Apocalypse and B is for Broken 🙂

Interview With Simon Kewin

What letter were you assigned? J

Please share a short excerpt from your story:

“You stayed true, though,” she said. “Those promises we made to each other that day at Hong Kong Station.” A wicked smile crept across her features. “And the ones we whispered the night before in this cramped little hab room. You remember?”

Of course he remembered. “You can’t be here,” he said again. “We’re on a wrecked alien spaceship in the Kuiper Belt, not at Hong Kong station. That was all a long time ago. You’re not Avi. None of this is possible.”

What is the thing you’ve most regretted breaking? When I was, like, four years old I broke my brother’s toy spaceship. Just after he’d received it. On Christmas Day.

Have you ever broken something and not been saddened by it? Can you tell us about that? Fast, every day.

If you could break one law and get away with it consequence-free, what would it be? Something that brings huge financial gain. Then I could spend my days writing. From my Caribbean villa.

Do you have any rules for yourself, a code of some sort, which you’d never break? I’ve been a vegetarian for nearly 30 years, so eating meat would be one.

Never ever? A couple of times in that period I’ve eaten nibbled on some dead creature’s cooked remains, generally to try something new that someone said I should. It didn’t give me a change of heart.

Did you struggle with the letter you were assigned, or did the ideas come freely? The ideas came pretty freely. Although, actually, I posted on my blog asking for ideas, and the inspiration for the story I wrote came from someone’s suggestion.

What was your favourite idea you didn’t use? My contribution to A is for Apocalypse was science fiction, so I quite wanted to do a fantasy story for B is for Broken. Which didn’t work out, but I was playing with the idea of a Jack-in-the-Green story for a time.

What, aside from the anthology’s theme and your letter inspired your story? The image in my head of this vast, weird, alien spaceship floating ghost-like in the void. That and breaking my brother’s toy spaceship when I was four…

 


 

Simon KewinSimon Kewin is the author of over 100 published short or flash stories. He lives in England with his wife and their daughters. His cyberpunk novel The Genehunter and his fantasy novels Engn and Hedge Witch were recently published. Find him at simonkewin.co.uk.

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B is for Broken is available now at:
Smashwords
Kobo
Amazon
Barnes and Noble

And add it to your shelves at Goodreads

 

FAE is $0.99!

FAE sale

If you haven’t picked up a copy Fae there will never be a better time!

Fae is on sale.

Right now.

For less than a dollar.

What more can I say?

Meet Robin Goodfellow as you’ve never seen him before, watch damsels in distress rescue themselves, get swept away with the selkies and enjoy tales of hobs, green men, pixies and phookas. One thing is for certain, these are not your grandmother’s fairy tales.

Fairies have been both mischievous and malignant creatures throughout history. They’ve dwelt in forests, collected teeth or crafted shoes. Fae is full of stories that honor that rich history while exploring new and interesting takes on the fair folk from castles to computer technologies to modern midwifing, the Old World to Indianapolis.

Fae bridges traditional and modern styles, from the familiar feeling of a good old-fashioned fairy tale to urban fantasy and horror with a fae twist. This anthology covers a vast swath of the fairy story spectrum, making the old new and exploring lush settings with beautiful prose and complex characters.

Available directly from the publisher:

Paperback $11.95
Ebook $0.99

Or find it online:

Amazon
Barnes & Noble (Paperback)
Barnes & Noble (Nook)
Kobo
Books-a-Million

Mike Sale Quote

P.S. Fellow Canadians, you know how people say ‘Our book is on sale for $0.99!’ and then you go to the page and you find out it’s $0.99 US and actually because you live in Canada you have to pay $1.24? Well, not today. Fae is on sale for $0.99 CDN if you buy it from Amazon.ca or Kobo (Canada). Because.

Sale ends July 29th.

 

#ScarecrowSelfies

Scarecrow -- Dragon Age: Origins

My character & Alistair with a scarecrow in Dragon Age: Origins

I want to give you TEN (10) copies of Scarecrow.

Yep. You read that right.

I’m going to give one person ten copies of Scarecrow. That lucky winner can keep one and give the other nine away however they want to–to their book club, friends, relatives, libraries or random people on the internet–whatever they want. Why? Well, mostly because giving away books is fun and I want to spread the joy around 🙂

How do you enter?

Take photos of or with scarecrows and share them on social media (Twitter, Facebook) using the hashtag #ScarecrowSelfies (If you don’t do social media I will post and share on your behalf — email your pictures to me at fae [at] worldweaverpress.com)

I will compile and share/link to the photos on my blog, because c’mon, of course I will!

Every photo taken will count as an entry into the draw and you will get an extra entry if your photo contains a copy of either CORVIDAE or FAE

And as I said, the winner will receive a box of copies of SCARECROW to share however you want. Actually, I’ll give you a bonus entry if you post on social media using the #ScarecrowSelfies and tell us how you would give away the books if you won.

That’s three ways to enter the draw. C’mon, it’ll be fun!

I will hold the draw on the morning of August 13th so make sure your entries are in by the 12th.

 

Official-Type Stuff & FAQs

You cannot sell the nine extra copies, you must give them away for free.

The books are shipping from inside the US so if you live outside the US you are still welcome to enter but if you win you will be responsible for any customs, duty or other costs associated with importing the books.

Why not give eight people one copy of SCARECROW instead of giving one person eight copies?

Why not? I want to try something different and we’ll still be running a Goodreads giveaway for SCARECROW the same as we have for FAE and CORVIDAE so this isn’t the only chance people will have to win a copy but it is the only chance they’ll have to win nine of them 🙂

Does the picture have to be with a real scarecrow?

Nope. I’m open to all sorts of creative interpretations on this one. A picture of you with a picture of a scarecrow? Cool. A screenshot from a video game with a scarecrow? Okay. A friend dressed up as a scarecrow posing with you? Awesome. Please feel free to think outside the box on this one.

Have a question? Hit me up, I’m happy to answer 🙂

 

Some of the entries:

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Following the Eight-Span Crow

Today I am super stoked to share a guest post from the lovely Susan Spann. Susan’s newest book, FLASK OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER came out just this week so I invited her to visit my blog to talk about it. She did even better that–this post has corvids! Whoot! It’s almost like she knows the way to my heart or something 😉

 

Following the Eight-Span Crow

by Susan Spann

woodcutcrowWestern legends often portray the crow as a harbinger of disaster, lurking about like Poe’s raven to observe the misfortunes of man.

In Japan, the crow is more often seen as evidence of positive divine intervention in human affairs. The Shinto pantheon even includes a crow god, Yatagarasu (“the eight-span crow”), who symbolizes guidance. A crow’s appearance portends rebirth, new growth, and supernatural guidance. According to the Kojiki (Japan’s oldest historical record), the eight-span crow led Jimmu, a human descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu, to the site where he assumed the throne and became the first Emperor of Japan.

I recently traveled to Japan to research the next few books in my Shinobi Mystery series (and also another novel I’m now writing on the side). Crows play a significant role in one of the upcoming mysteries, and I hoped to see a Japanese crow (Corvus macrorhynchos, also known as the Jungle Crow or Large-Billed crow) on my travels.

Little did I know that Yatagarasu also had something special in store for me…

On my second day in Kyoto, I visited Fushimi Inari Taisha, one of Japan’s most important Shinto shrines, and a location which features prominently in one of my upcoming novels. The shrine consists of buildings at the base of Mount Inari and a path that winds up the side of the mountain to another shrine at the very top. The climb takes several hours, so many people don’t do the entire thing, but I wanted the full experience, so up I went…alone.

The primary path up the mountain is lined with thousands of torii gates, which represent the passage from the worldly to a sacred space.

A little way up the mountain, a path branches off from the main one. Visitors who opt to follow the “road less taken” are rewarded by a sub-shrine with statues memorializing the dragon guardians of Japan (fascinating, but a subject for another post).

Another, evcrow2en less traveled path, leads out and away from this sub-shrine, through a primeval bamboo grove. I knew I had a long hike ahead, but I couldn’t resist the temptation to follow the bamboo path for a little while.

Ten minutes later, deep in the heart of an undisturbed primeval forest, I heard a flutter of wings and found myself face to face with a giant black crow. It landed not three feet away, on the side of the path, and looked at me with absolutely no fear. We stared at each other for several minutes—me, memorizing his every detail, and him apparently hoping I’d offer a handout (I didn’t…but only because I had nothing with me he’d want).

The crow showed no concern about me, but flew away when it heard another couple approaching along the path. They saw it leave—and seemed disappointed that the giant bird didn’t stay long enough for them to get a photograph. I continued up the mountain without telling them that it had stayed for me.

Several days later, I visited Kasuga Taisha, another major Shinto shrine (and, not surprisingly, the setting for another upcoming book). As I approached the entrance, a giant crow swooped down and landed on the entry post. Like the one at Fushimi Inari (over a hundred miles away) he watched me approach and waited for me to come and stand beside him.

Japanese crows, like their brethren around the world, are confident birds with little fear of people. It’s common to see them at Shinto shrines and they often watch the visitors with interest.

Even so, I couldn’t help but feel that the crows at Fushimi Inari and Kasuga—and others I continued to see at critical moments throughout the trip—appeared as a special, and positive, sign that my travels and my writing are taking me in the right direction.

I’m not superstitious by nature, but after my eerily timely encounters with Japanese crows, I absolutely understand why Japanese legend says the crow is a wise and benevolent sign of heaven’s favor. I was honored to have them “leading” me through my travels in Japan.

crow

Susan Spann writes the Shinobi Mysteries, featuring ninja detective Hiro Hattori and his Portuguese Jesuit sidekick, Father Mateo. Her third novel, FLASK OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER, released on July 14, 2015. When not writing or practicing law, she raises seahorses and rare corals in her marine aquarium. You can find her online at http://www.SusanSpann.com, on Twitter (@SusanSpann), and on Facebook (SusanSpannAuthor), where she regularly blogs about Japan, publishing law, and seahorses.

[Text and Photographs © 2015 Susan Spann]

Staycation 2015

Canoe

That photograph is from our last family vacation when we went to Nova Scotia in 2012. I can’t believe it’s been three years already, time has started doing crazy things in these past few years… Anyway, the reason I’m sharing that photo is because I don’t really have a more appropriate one to use to announce this year’s staycation 🙂

For the next couple weeks though I will be at home and working a (very) little bit, I will mostly be on vacation. It’s a very awkward period to take off, coming as it does between book launches, but it was the only time I could find a couple weeks on the calendar that Jo and I both felt comfortable taking off. So there you have it.

I’ve got a handful of pre-scheduled blog and Twitter posts and I will be checking my email to make sure there aren’t any urgent matters that need my attention but between now and the 28th my goal is to be online as little as possible.

I’ll see you on the other side where I hope to be rested, refreshed and ready to get back to work 🙂

 

 

Fractured Friday: Alexandra Seidel

B is for Broken. Cover design by Jonathan C. Parrish, original artwork by Tory Hoke

Cover design by Jonathan C. Parrish, original artwork by Tory Hoke

For the next several weeks I’ve decided to call Fridays ‘Fractured Friday’ and use them to share news, contributor interviews and excerpts from B is for Broken.

B is for Broken is the second title in the Alphabet Anthologies series. It follows A is for Apocalypse and will in turn be followed by C is for Chimera. Each story in the series is associated with a letter of the alphabet and is titled in the letter is for word format. What’s more, just to keep things nice and complicated, the story’s title isn’t shared at the beginning but at the end so that you can guess at what it might be while you read.

On that note, even though the story titles could be considered spoilers because of how the book is formatted, for the sake of simplicity if the author has chosen to post their title publicly somewhere else (their blog, Facebook, wherever) I am going to include it in my posts. If they haven’t revealed that information, though, I’ll list the story titles as Letter is for…

 


I met Alexa through Niteblade, first as a submitter then a slush reader and, eventually, the poetry editor. We’ve worked together for several years now and it’s always been a true pleasure. I am super stoked to include Alexa’s work in both A is for Apocalypse and B is for Broken 🙂

Interview With Alexandra Seidel

What letter were you assigned? H

Please share a short excerpt from your story: The second peddler has a hat weighing heavy with cream white roses. “A cup is a beautiful thing. When it breaks, there is grief in the world[…]

What is the thing you’ve most regretted breaking? A clock. I was still a kid back then, and I broke it while playing. The clock was a gift to someone else, and something that was lost forever in a way because the gift giver is dead.

Have you ever broken something and not been saddened by it? Can you tell us about that? Actually, this is how I try to feel when I accidentally break something. I tell myself, it’s broken. You cannot unbreak it. This is the reality of the situation. Accept and move on.

If you could break one law and get away with it consequence-free, what would it be? The first law of thermodynamics. It’s just because I want a perpetual motion machine. I figure it’d be way cooler than an iPod.

Do you have any rules for yourself, a code of some sort, which you’d never break? The categorical imperative comes to mind.

Never ever? Well, I write fiction you know, so never is a challenge more than anything. Maybe I’ll explore that further down the Alphabet Series…

Did you struggle with the letter you were assigned, or did the ideas come freely? Well, I first wrote another story, but it wasn’t right. Then, this story happened, and even when I was feeling it come together in my head, I knew that it was for Broken.

What, aside from the anthology’s theme and your letter inspired your story? Life. And death.

 


 

Alexa SeidelAlexandra Seidel is a writer, poet, and editor. H is for Hanging Man (aka The Hanging Man Who Does Not Heal) is her second story in the Alphabet Series. Other than that, her writing appeared in Strange Horizons, Lackington’s, Stone Telling, and elsewhere. If you are so inclined you can follow Alexa on Twitter (@Alexa_Seidel) or read her blog: www.tigerinthematchstickbox.blogspot.com.

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B is for Broken is available now at:
Smashwords
Kobo
Amazon
Barnes and Noble

And add it to your shelves at Goodreads

 

WWP

Corvidae Press Release

WWP

Contact:
Elizabeth Wagner
publicity@worldweaverpress.com

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, PLEASE

 “CORVIDAE”
EDITED BY RHONDA PARRISH

Alpena, MI (July 7, 2015) – World Weaver Press (Eileen Wiedbrauk, Editor-in-Chief) has announced the anthology Corvidae, volume two of Rhonda Parrish’s Magical Menageries, is available in trade paperback and ebook today, Tuesday, July 7.

Praise for Corvidae:“Corvidae evokes the majesty and mischief of corvid mythologies worldwide—and beyond our world—in a collection that is fresh and thoroughly enjoyable.”

— Beth Cato, author of The Clockwork Dagger

“Smart and dark like the corvids themselves, this excellent collection of stories and poems will bring you a murder of chills, a tiding of intrigue, a band of the fantastic, and—most of all—an unkindness of sleepy mornings after you’ve stayed up too late reading it!”

— Karen Dudley, author of Kraken Bake

“Magic and corvids collide in this certain to intrigue anthology.”

— Joshua Klein, hacker and inventor of the crow vending machine

“A creepy, crazy kaleidoscope of corvids, Corvidae is what happens when you bring together ingenious writers and sagacious subjects. It’s nothing short of a thrill ride when this anthology takes flight.”

— Susan G. Friedman, Ph. D., Utah State University; behaviorworks.org.

“As sparkling and varied as a corvid’s hoard of treasures, Corvidae is by turns playful and somber, menacing and mischievous. From fairy tale to steampunk adventure, from field of war to scene of crime, these magical birds will take you to places beyond your wildest imaginings.”

— Jennifer Crow, poet and corvid-by-marriage

 Associated with life and death, disease and luck, corvids have long captured mankind’s attention, showing up in mythology as the companions or manifestations of deities, and starring in stories from Aesop to Poe and beyond. In Corvidae birds are born of blood and pain, trickster ravens live up to their names, magpies take human form, blue jays battle evil forces, and choughs become prisoners of war. These stories will take you to the Great War, research facilities, frozen mountaintops, steam-powered worlds, remote forest homes, and deep into fairy tales. One thing is for certain, after reading this anthology, you’ll never look the same way at the corvid outside your window.

Corvidae features works by Jane Yolen, Mike Allen, C.S.E. Cooney, M.L.D. Curelas, Tim Deal, Megan Engelhardt, Megan Fennell, Adria Laycraft, Kat Otis, Michael S. Pack, Sara Puls, Michael M. Rader, Mark Rapacz, Angela Slatter, Laura VanArendonk Baugh, and Leslie Van Zwol.

Corvidae is available in trade paperback and ebook via Amazon.com, Barnesandnoble.com, Kobo.com, WorldWeaverPress.com, and other online retailers, and for wholesale through Ingram. You can also find Corvidae on Goodreads.

Rhonda Parrish is a master procrastinator and nap connoisseur but despite that she somehow manages a full professional life. She has been the publisher and editor-in-chief of Niteblade Magazine for over five years now (which is like 25 years in internet time) and is the editor of the benefit anthology Metastasis, as well as the World Weaver Press anthologies Fae, Scarecrow, and Corvidae. In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been included or is forthcoming in dozens of publications including Tesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast and Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. Her website, updated weekly, is at rhondaparrish.com.

World Weaver Press is an independently owned publisher of fantasy, paranormal, and science fiction. We believe in great storytelling.

Publication Date for Corvidae: July 7, 2015 • Fantasy / Horror
$12.95 trade paperback, 234 pages • $5.99 ebook
Corvidae ISBN: 978-0692430217
Publicity/Reviews: publicity@worldweaverpress.com
Information:
https://www.worldweaverpress.com/corvidae.html

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